Ancestors of Helen R. Hawkins


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picture Dorothy Rowell

      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 20 Jan 1720 - Amesbury, Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts 1
    Christening: 
          Death: 
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Philip Rowell 1
         Mother: Sarah Davis 1 2


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Emmeline Rowell

      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 27 Feb 1835 - Percy(Stark), New Hampshire 1
    Christening: 
          Death: 1836 1
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Joshua Rowell 1
         Mother: Sybil Eunice Spaulding 1


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Emmeline Rowell

      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 6 Jan 1837 - Percy(Stark), New Hampshire 1
    Christening: 
          Death: 1838 1
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Joshua Rowell 1
         Mother: Sybil Eunice Spaulding 1


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Eugene Clark Rowell

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 25 Aug 1875 - Saguache, CO
    Christening: 
          Death: 22 Jan 1956 - Angwin, California
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Isaac Rowell 1
         Mother: Elmira Eisenlord Wilbur

Spouses and Children
1. Winifred M Peebles
       Marriage: 1 Jun 1908 - College View, NE

2. *Minnie Marie Olson
       Marriage: 9 Jun 1932 - Raton, NM
       Children:
                1. Albert Lee Rowell

Notes
General:
"As Bert once said, Gene had a tremendous capacity for learning, but his ability to learn was exercised only incidentally until he was well into adulthood. For several years he worked at many different trades and occupations, as opportunity offered: coal mining, ranching, gold mining, lumbering, as a stationary engineer, as a carpenter. Once when I was with him on the old narrow guage train going through the Black Canyon of the Gunnison, the news hawk tried to sell him a picture card of Curecanti Needle. Gene said he wasn't interested, he had seen it all day every day for too many days when he was helping to lay the track.
When he was 29 years of age, he decided that what he needed most was an education, so he entered the High School at Delta, Colorado, as a freshman. Six years later he was teaching Latin in college, and in between had completed a ministerial course and was qualified as a minister of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. His B. A. was from Union College, Lincoln, Nebraska, M. A. from the University of Nebraska. He was a professor of English.
When he retired, after 25 years, checking up his credits, he said he had 27 college years of English. The few years leave he took from teaching for ministerial work were spent in Bermuda. He brought to his work such dedication and competence his parishioners felt it should have been his life work.
He was a poet, with a philosopher's outlook, a sense of humor, and a feeling for tragedy. I have always thought of him as a big man, physically, mentally, spiritually, big of mind and of hearts." ----Albert Lee Rowell 1

picture Ichabod Rowell

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 2 Nov 1729 - Amesbury, Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts 1
    Christening: 
          Death: 
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Philip Rowell 1
         Mother: Sarah Davis 1 2


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Ina Martha Rowell

      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 17 Apr 1886 - Dallas, CO
    Christening: 
          Death: Jul 1964 - Arlington, CA
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Isaac Rowell 1
         Mother: Elmira Eisenlord Wilbur

Spouses and Children
1. *Harry Glenn Collins
       Marriage: 13 Aug 1908 - Cedaredge, Delta, Colorado


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Isaac Rowell



      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 13 Aug 1838 - Percy(Stark), New Hampshire 1
    Christening: 
          Death: 2 Apr 1907 1
         Burial: 1907 - Cedaredge, Delta, Colorado 1

Parents
         Father: Joshua Rowell 1
         Mother: Sybil Eunice Spaulding 1

Spouses and Children
1. *Elmira Eisenlord Wilbur
       Marriage: 26 Jul 1868 - Ponca, Nebraska
       Children:
                1. Albert Chester Rowell
                2. Minnie Irene Rowell
                3. Charles "Page" Paige Rowell
                4. Eugene Clark Rowell
                5. Wilbur Spaulding Rowell
                6. Sybil Ann Rowell
                7. Lavina Penelope Rowell
                8. Ina Martha Rowell
                9. Phoebe Loretta Rowell
                10. Alfred Lee Rowell

Notes
General:
Isaac Smith Rowell was born in 1838 at Stark, NH, to Joshua and Sybil Eunice (Spaulding) Rowell. He was the sixth of eleven children.
In about 1839, the family moved to Quebec Province, Canada, near the town of Granby. There, Isaac’s father Joshua operated a tavern and a sawmill between Granby and Abbotsford, by a stream known as “Brandy Brook.” The spot was used as a stage stop before the railroad came. It was there that Isaac grew up, speaking French as naturally as English.
In 1856 Isaac’s father deeded his property to his son Spaulding. Part of the deed specified that Spaulding provide his brother Isaac, then 18 years old, with two suits of clothes and $50 when Isaac reached the age of 21, and to procure for Isaac six months of schooling.
Isaac took this schooling, which we assume lasted more than six months, at McGill University in Montreal. His principal training was civil engineering and surveying. He also became interested and skilled in mathematics and languages. Family legend has it that he spoke seven languages.
At the age of 23, Isaac returned to the United States. He applied to the U.S. Navy for service during the Civil War. The Navy rejected him for a tendency to rheumatism, and even worse, flat feet. It did no good for Isaac to explain that just the day before, he had climbed Mount Washington in a nasty storm and caught cold. The flat feet charge became a family joke, as in later years he routinely walked great distances while working as a surveyor, and to the end of his life he preferred walking to riding a horse. At the age of 56, he wrote to his brother Paige that he could outwalk a camel. History does not relate whether any camels were ever accepted into the U.S. Navy.
At age 28, in 1866, Isaac was teaching in South Gardner, Massachusetts. He had invested his earnings in a small chair factory, which burned. Having no insurance, he decided to take a train as far west as his money would take him. It turned out to be enough to land him in Ponca, Nebraska.
Among his other skills, Isaac had been schooled as a millwright and wheelwright. So, a group of farmers near Ponca hired him to build a grain mill. One of the farmers was Jefferson Wilbur. Mr. Wilbur invited Isaac to his home for dinner and to meet his family, including a young school teacher - his daughter Elmira, or Myra as she was known. Some recollections are that the meal featured, along with other delights, roast antelope. On the table was a jar of mustard. The cap for the mustard jar was a thin wafer of cork. After dinner, when Mrs. Wilbur cleared the table, she couldn’t find the cap. Another Wilbur daughter Clara, eleven years old, reported to her mother that, “Mr. Rowell was so busy looking at Myra that he ate the cork. I saw him do it.”


And so, on July 26, 1868, Isaac and Elmira were married. They lived in Ponca for some years, where their son Albert Chester Rowell and daughter Minnie Irene Rowell were born. Myra’s health became poor, and upon the advice of a doctor, they joined a wagon train heading west across the plains to the Colorado Territory, which had been established eleven years earlier. Riding in a wagon pulled by oxen, the young Rowells arrived in Saguache in 1872. Traveling with them in the same wagon train was the Hotchkiss family, who later pioneered the town of Hotchkiss. For the time being, both families settled in Saguache.
In Saguache, Isaac Smith Rowell worked as a smithy and wheelwright, as well as land surveyor. Two sons were born in Saguache - Charles Paige Rowell, and Eugene Clark Rowell. Myra was uneasy about the tension in Saguache between settlers and Indians. She had been through some childhood scares in Nebraska from Indians. So, when Isaac expressed a wish to go to Ouray, where a new gold camp was opening up on Ute land (contrary to a U.S. treaty), Myra and the kids climbed into a stagecoach and went back to Nebraska to visit her family.
In 1876, the year Colorado was admitted to the Union, Isaac was in Ouray during the first election held under statehood. The celebration was a wild one. Isaac told of a fellow who rode an anvil shot into the air with dynamite - called “shooting the anvil” - and the fellow said afterwards, he “never fell so high in his life.”


Although there were still worries about Indian unrest, Myra was determined to return to Colorado. She and the children made the trip in 1879. An effort was made to discourage them from taking the stagecoach from Creede to Ouray because of threatened Indian uprisings. But Myra was independent, self-reliant, and determined. Her reaction was so vigorous that they were allowed to go ahead, the authorities apparently reasoning that the Utes could take their chances.
The family lived for the next few years in the Uncompahgre and Dallas Creek area, not far from present Ridgeway. Isaac and Myra preempted a parcel of land along Dallas Creek, where he built a log home. The family farmed the land, and Isaac found work designing and building mills, smelters, and other mining structures around the area. He also became involved in lumbering and sawmill operations, harvesting Ponderosa pine in the areas of Log Hill Mesa and Spruce Mountain. He designed and supervised a ditch building project, of which he was one of the users. The ditch still exists, and is known as the Hoskins-Rowell Ditch.
The family grew during the years on Dallas Creek. Son Wilbur Spaulding Rowell and daughters Sybil Ann Rowell and Ina Martha Rowell were born there. Also, infant girl Lavinia Penelope Rowell was born there in 1884. She lived only a few weeks, and was buried somewhere in that area, though the exact site is unknown. Following Lavinia’s death, and concerned with daughter Minnie’s health, they left Dallas Creek. A doctor had recommended a lower, warmer spot, preferably California. But, when the family arrived by wagon in Delta, Minnie was so much improved that they stopped there. In fact, Minnie continued to grow stronger all the years they lived in Delta County.
They lived at first near Delta, but soon began a peripatetic (Isaac would have loved that word) existence. Isaac’s surveying skills were in demand throughout the Surface Creek valley. He and his sons built the Rollins coal mine, along with the road to it, on the side of Grand Mesa west of Eckert. The family lived at the mine for a while. Then they left the mine and moved further up the valley to Coalby, where Alfred Lee Rowell, their last child, was born.
Isaac then acquired a ranch north of Eckert, along the present highway 65, just below what’s called Trickle Bridge over Surface Creek. While the family was living there, daughter Phoebe Loretta was born. Sadly, the whole family came down with measles, and Phoebe died as an infant. The ranch was lost due to some questionable dealings by financiers. It seemed that Isaac’s business ventures were often dogged by bad luck. There was the chair factory fire back in Massachusetts. Then there was a mill in Ouray which Isaac spent a year working on, and was never paid.
After losing the ranch, it was back to Coalby for the Rowells, where a homestead was established. The remnants still remain. Despite business setbacks, Isaac was always able to find work. He established a reputation as a superb land surveyor and engineer, and there was plenty of demand. The first government survey was incomplete, with considerable areas omitted, and with missing corner markers. Better surveys were needed in order for settlers to file proper claims on the land. Isaac became known for his thoroughness and accuracy. When a government re-survey was made later, the surveyor in charge remarked that, when he found a survey made by I. S. Rowell, he knew he could accept it without question.
One of his outstanding accomplishments was the Leon Lake tunnel. This is a tunnel carrying water from Leon Lake, which is located on the north side of Grand Mesa (in Mesa County) through the spine of the mountain to the south side, in Delta County. The tunnel is around 1300 feet long, and lies above 10,500 feet elevation. Isaac Rowell did not design the project originally. He became involved when the Italian tunnel crew who were hired to do the work got suspicious of the design and demanded a survey by I. S. Rowell. Isaac discovered that the tunnel, which was to be bored simultaneously from each end, would fail to connect in the middle by about 20 feet. He was pleased when the bores following his new headings met squarely, with only the direction of the tool marks to tell the meeting spot.
In recent years, examples have been obtained of his beautiful and abundant handwriting, featuring letters and poetry he wrote while at the tunnel camp. Copies of these writings have been presented to the current board of directors of the Leon lake Company. The letters clearly document that Isaac was at the site, closely involved with the miners and the tunnel project. It was the first documentation available to the Leon Lake Company as to who made the tunnel, and they were pleased to receive it.
Undoubtedly, Isaac’s language skills came in handy working with the Italians in the tunnel. On another project, putting up a building, his linguistics again served him well, if a little strangely. The crew was of mixed nationalities, various immigrants who had come west to seek their fortunes. One big fellow was Russian, and had not a word of English. This made for problems in explaining his work duties, and communication in general, since nobody, even Isaac Rowell, spoke Russian. One day Isaac mashed his thumb with a hammer. Needing desperately to swear, but apparently being unusually sensitive to affronting people around him with English curses, he cut loose in Latin. The big Russian rushed around the corner of the building and embraced Isaac, expressing sympathy - in Latin. From then on, the communication gap was closed.


Another of Isaac’s memorable and lasting accomplishments is the survey and construction of the Granby reservoirs, a project he named for his first home in Quebec. The project, comprising a system of 11 reservoirs, occupied a period from about 1892 to 1898, and required a massive committment of labor and time. It would not be considered an easy project even today. In fact, the permits and approvals required to start such a project today might even put Isaac Rowell out of the mood. The reservoir sites were hewn out of fields of boulders, using the best available technology of the time - picks, shovels, mules, horses, scrapers, dynamite, and above all, human muscle power. It was a neighborhood project, involving several families from the area. Myra, Isaac, and the older sons camped out on Grand Mesa during the project, with Myra serving as camp cook. The Granbys, as they are called, were built to store and provide water for the Coalby area through the Granby Ditch, also surveyed, supervised, and built by Isaac, his sons, and their neighbors. In addition to the Granby Ditch, there is also to this day a Rowell Ditch serving Coalby.
There are well preserved and complete records of the organization of the Granby Ditch and Reservoir Company. Throughout the early years of its existence, the Rowell family was deeply involved. For example: first year, Isaac Smith Rowell - superintendent and secretary; second year, Albert Chester Rowell, treasurer and Isaac S. Rowell, secretary; fifth year, Charles Paige Rowell, president, and Eugene Clark Rowell, Secretary. We are grateful to the Granby Ditch and Reservoir Company for the excellent condition of these early writings of Isaac Rowell, and for making them available.
In 1903, a group of citizens of the Cedaredge area organized themselves into the Cedaredge Church of Seventh-Day Adventists. There was no church building, so services were held in the homes of members, with some people walking miles to attend. From the archives of the Church, this quote, “At the meeting held on September 8, 1906, Brother Isaac and Sister Myra Rowell were taken into the church by letter. - Edna Baker, Clerk Pro Tem.”


Further quote from the archives, “Elder States being present, Brother I. S. Rowell was ordained as Elder of the Cedaredge Church and Brother Irving E. Baker was ordained as Deacon of the Church. Brother Isaac Rowell was killed on April 2, 1907, by his tam running away. His funeral service was held at the hall in Cedaredge on April 5, 1907. Elder States preached the sermon and was assisted by the Baptist minister. Signed Helen Baker, Clerk.”


And, so ended the life of Isaac Smith Rowell. He was driving down what was then known as the Rowell Grade into the Colby valley, where home was. The team of horses was green, and inclined to be skittish. Something spooked them, and they galloped down the grade. The wagon overturned, and Isaac was killed at the age of 69, dying as he had lived, full speed ahead. It was a great loss of an intelligent, talented, and valuable man.
After Isaac’s death Elmira Wilbur Rowell eventually moved to California and lived near family members there. She died at the age of 75 in Eureka, California, where she is buried. Myra was in her way as remarkable a person as her husband - intelligent, strong willed, and skilled in so many useful ways. She was often called upon by neighbors for her nursing skills. She wielded a strong hand over her household, and coped with the many difficulties of a large family, enduring the long absences of her husband as he went about his many enterprises.
An entire story could be written about Myra Rowell, and in fact, there has been. The book “Boy,” an autobiograpy of Eugene Clark Rowell, contains a wealth of insight into the character of Myra. There is no doubt that Isaac knew her to be a great part of his successes. He relied on her spiritual faith and strength and her tireless work in keeping home and family together throughout their wanderings, and while he worked on jobs away from home. Surely her indomitable spirit is here today, joining us in blessing her husband and their tiny daughter and their son.
May their spirits be joined with all their loved ones who have passed over and all of us who will someday join them. Our love and blessings go with them now.

picture Jacob Rowell

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 1671
    Christening: 
          Death: 1731
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Philip Rowell
         Mother: Sarah Morrill

Spouses and Children
1. *Hannah Barnard
       Marriage: 
       Children:
                1. Sr. Daniel Rowell


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Jacob Rowell

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 14 Sep 1710 - Amesbury, Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts 1
    Christening: 
          Death: 
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Philip Rowell 1
         Mother: Sarah Davis 1 2
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Sources


1 Anna Mae Rowell, "Thomas Rowell and some Allied Families."

2 Essex Books, The Davis Family - Descendants of: Thomas Davis of Haverhill, MA; James Davis of Haverhill, MA; Frances Davis of Amesbury, MA; John Davis of Newbury and Amesbury, MA (From "Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury" With Additional Davis Genealogical Data from: Pope's Pioneeers of Massachusetts and Savage's Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England.
Extracted from the above sources and republished by: Essex Books Lecanto, FL www.essexbooks.com), End notes.


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