Ancestors of Helen R. Hawkins


picture

picture Mary Catherine Hull



      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 12 Aug 1868 - Prob. MO
    Christening: 
          Death: 1961 - Delta, Delta, Colorado
         Burial: 

Events

• Move to: Arrived in Grand Junction, CO, 28 Nov 1882, Grand Junction, Mesa, Colorado.


Parents
         Father: John Wesley Hull
         Mother: Sarah Gilmore

Spouses and Children
1. *Lawrence S. "Larry" Heath
       Marriage: 8 Jun 1890 - Mesa County, CO
       Children:
                1. Baby One Heath
                2. Baby Two Heath

2. Harry N Hicks
       Marriage: 11 Jun 1895 - Mesa County, CO

3. Spickelmeyer
       Marriage: est 1900 - Probably Lake City, CO

4. Henry Watkins 1 
       Marriage: 23 Feb 1910 - Colorado

Notes
General:
When I was a child, Aunt Mamie would occasionally show me the little shoes her babies wore. At the age of 93 she still mourned the loss of her babies. I wish I could remember whether or not they were boys or girls. -- Helen R. Hawkins

Mary Catherine Hull, my great aunt, told me that the little clay shoes that I have were brought over to American with Mary Owens (RPN #1206). Mary must have given the shoes to her daughter Elizabeth and Elizabeth gave them to Henry Watkins who then gave them to my great aunt Mary Catherine.

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Mary Catherine "Mamie" Hull1

From the reflections of Dorcas Dorothy Edson Davis
With some notes and editing by Helen Rose Davis Hawkins


For a bit I would like to talk about Auntie Mamie. She was just the opposite in character from her sister. I think she must have suffered from an under active thyroid. Poor soul, she worked very hard all of her life, but she was slow. Unlike her sister, she could not command the better paying, more pleasant jobs. The work she did was more like drudgery.

I have an old photograph of Mamie taken when she was a girl. She was a bit over weight even then but not unattractive. In fact she was a cute little thing. I believe that it was before her mother's death she married a miner, Larry Heath.. Their baby died of summer complaint.

Summer complaint is an intestinal infection caused by improper refrigeration of milk, resulting in the growth of bacteria. In the old days this disease was very common among babies being weaned or babies who for some reason could not nurse at their mother's breasts.

Shortly after this tragedy Larry was killed in a snow slide near a little mining town called Ironton, Colorado. Mamie was pregnant with her second child at the time. In his second summer, this child also died of summer complaint. By the time Mamie was twenty five years old she had lost a husband and two babies.

That was not the end of misadventure for poor Mamie.

A few years later she married again. "Her husband truly loved Mamie," my mother-in-law said. "He called her all sorts of pet names and was as good as gold to her."

Mamie, for her part, was deeply in love with him and for a time - I do not know how long - they were very happy together. They lived near Lake City, Colorado. One day there was some kind of "doings" in Lake City. Mamie and her husband happily went to town to have fun. It so happened that the stagecoach arrived in Lake City that day. His past must have arrived with it. He hurried Mamie home, borrowed a saddle from Alice's7 husband. (Alice's husband's last name was Prizendentz.) "He never saw it again," my mother-in-law said, with some satisfaction when telling me about it. She did not like Prizendentz.

Mamie's husband borrowed the saddle and took off on horseback. Mamie never saw him again. She was heart broken, truly heart broken. From then on Victoria and her husband Napoleon looked after Mamie as best they could.

In spite of their care an unkind fate was not yet through with Mamie.

Sister Alice divorced and moved to California. Napoleon, Victoria, their family and Mamie had moved to Cimmeron, Colorado. Napoleon and Victoria went to California to visit Alice. While they were gone Mamie married again - this time to a man named Spicklemeyer. Why she married this man no one could possibly figure out. I don't know if he actually beat her, but he was certainly unkind.

"One time," Mamie told me, "I had been visiting a neighbor. It was dark when I got home and he had the door locked and wouldn't let me in." She had to walk a mile or so and spend the night at a neighbors house. "I was so cold." she said, shivering at the memory.

After their return from California Victoria and Napoleon extricated her from this situation.

Sometime later Mamie married still another time. This time to Henry Watkins. Henry was good to Mamie and they spent twenty happy years together. He died in the late twenties or early thirties - the early years of the Great Depression.

I became acquainted with Auntie Mamie in 1937. At this time I had moved from Arizona to Colorado with Blackie and my baby Alice. I learned to love Auntie Mamie in spite of, or, perhaps because of her oddities. 2
Marriage Notes (Henry Watkins)


picture Rowena Victoria Hull



      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 4 Sep 1876 - Missouri 3
    Christening: 
          Death: 7 Jun 1962 - Delta, Delta, Colorado 3
         Burial: 

Events

• Alt. Birth: 4 Sep 1879.

• Move to: Family Arrived in Grand Junction, CO, 28 Nov 1882, Grand Junction, Mesa, Colorado.

• After Joseph Napoleon Died: Cir 1916.


Parents
         Father: John Wesley Hull
         Mother: Sarah Gilmore

Spouses and Children
1. *Joseph Napoleon Davis
       Marriage: 1896 - Lake City, CO
       Children:
                1. Joseph Nehemiah Davis
                2. Charles Lyle "Blackie" Davis
                3. Mary Alice Davis

2. Robert Wear
       Marriage: 1943

Notes
General:
Children of Frontier Widow Recall Early Town History

(Transcribed from the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel September 15, 1957 Special Edition) (Footnotes by Helen R. Hawkins - Granddaughter of Rowena Victoria Hull Davis)

A tent pitched at Colorado Avenue and First Street was the first Grand Junction home for two sisters, now Delta residents, who were among the earliest residents of the new town. They are Mrs. J.H. (Victoria) Wear1 and Mrs. Mary Watkins. They were five and fourteen years old when they arrived with their parents, John and Sarah Hull, November 28, 1882. Mr. Hull had previously visited the town site and purchased four city lots soon after the Utes had been escorted out of the Valley by General McKenzie on September 1, 1881. His family had waited near Montrose while the valley was cleared of Indians. Traveling by covered wagon drawn by oxen and horses, they had come overland from the Midwest, crossing the state line on Mrs. Wear's first birthday, in 1878. During the trip, the family saw Chief Ouray at his home west of Montrose, and saw Chipeta many times. Arriving at the Grand River2 they crossed on a raft built from trees cut along the stream. The horses and cattle had to swim for it but one old oxen was swept away in the current and drowned. Wintered in Tent

The worst of the winter was spent in the tent. Meanwhile the head of the household, a carpenter by trade, cut cottonwood along the Grand River at the foot of First Street to build a cabin. It served as a dwelling until he completed a real house in 1883, at the same location. Later the cabin was torn down and the wood burned as fuel. Tragedy struck soon after the home was completed. The father became ill and died leaving his wife with four children, the two daughters, another girl, Alice, and Tom, both of whom are now gone. The widow managed somehow to rear her family, working at almost anything that presented itself. She nursed, sewed, washed and ironed. During the 14 years the family lived in Grand Junction, they came to know virtually all the early residents. Mrs. Watkins worked in the hotel where Governor George Crawford lived.

Business Development

When the Hulls arrived, there was already a small business center located on Colorado Avenue between Fourth and Fifth Streets. All these establishments freighted in their merchandise by wagon from Pueblo or Leadville. They carried a good supply of staple goods, although the grocers didn't try to keep fresh meat, only the salt variety. There was practically no demand for the fresh goods for awhile, since the townspeople had an ample supply of beef, venison and fish at their doorstep. AP. A. And W. A. Rice operated the first lumber yard, procuring their merchandise from their own sawmill on Pinyon Mesa. The Rice men came in 1882, their families in 1883. Job Payne and George Shackleton opened the Payne and Shackleton butcher shop before long, and Steve Scovil started an ice business. He cut huge blocks of ice in winter from the Grand River. The chunks three or four feet square, were often two feet thick. They were stored in an ice-house near the river, carefully packed in sawdust, and peddled to the townspeople by wagon during the summer. Job Gordon was the first boatman for the Grand River ferry. He was the son of a Mr. Gordon, a cattleman, who drowned in the river during the spring of 1882. With a companion, Gordon was dumped into the river when their skiff overturned as they were attempting a crossing. The companion reached shore safely, reporting to spectators that he had "sure heard the angels singing." First Hospital

Mrs. Mary Briley was the community's first nurse. She arrived before the Hull family. Originally the operator of a boarding house, she later enlarged her house to take care of sick folks, and it developed into what amounted to the first hospital. Mrs. Briley was part Choctaw Indian.

A favorite picnic spot was known as Wurtz' grove, about a mile below town on the river. The owner, Henry Wurtz, was a German and had a fine orchard of fruit trees.

Mrs. Wear married Joseph Napoleon (Poly) Davis in 1896 and moved to Lake City. They came back in 1904 for three years then moved to Cripple Creek. Mr. Davis died in 1916. After 27 years of widowhood, she married Mr. Wear in 1943.

Mrs. Watkins married Lawrence S. (Larry) Heath.4 He was killed in a snow slide near Ironton on March 21, 1892. Mary lived with her mother until her death in 1896, then she too moved to Lake City. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I was 11 years old when my grandmother, Rowena Victoria Hull, showed me this article in the newspaper. At that time I was not the least bit impressed about the article itself, but I do remember Grandmother flushed with excitement. It was this memory of Grandmother that, forty some years later, led me to the County Library in Grand Junction in search of the article.
There is one statement in the article that is not correct. My mother (Dorcas Dorothy Edson Davis) stated that Mamie "Mary Watkins" and Rowena had discussed whether or not it was appropriate to bring up the family problems for this article. They had decided to leave the matter of where and when John Hull died as vague as possible.
Mother figured that John Hull was a Mormon and that he died in Utah. Mamie spoke of another woman and baby who traveled with them to Colorado. She had mentioned to Dorcas that there was a terrible row back home in Missouri and Alice, her sister, would not come out west with the family. Neither Mamie nor Rowena would discuss their father's death with Dorcas.
Unaware of Dorcas's belief that John Hull was a Mormon my first cousin once removed, Jeannie Carol Davis told me that one afternoon she had asked her great-grandmother about her life. Uncharacteristically, Rowena told Carol of the hardship and anger she experienced of having her father leave them. She told Carol that her father was a Mormon and that her mother would not live with him. This conversation must have taken place around 1958 or 1959. - Helen R. Davis Hawkins

picture Thomas Hull

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 1871
    Christening: 
          Death: 25 Mar 1901
         Burial: 

Events

• Move to: Arrived in Grand Junction, CO, 28 Nov 1882, Grand Junction, Mesa, Colorado.


Parents
         Father: John Wesley Hull
         Mother: Sarah Gilmore
picture

Sources


1 (This little Bible is in bad shape. I have the page that this information came from with Elizabeth E. Owens Watkin's book.).

2 Writings of Dorcas Dorothy Edson Davis, "Writings of Dorcas Dorothy Edson Davis" (Dorcas wrote her memiors over a period of time from about 1985-2004. Her daughter Helen Rose Davis Hawkins has transcribed these writings with some editing and footnotes.).

3 Death Certificate.


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